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Posts Tagged ‘motivation

Raystown Olympic Triathlon Race Report

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Last weekend I did my first Olympic Triathlon, all I had done prior were shorter sprints. Following is a brutally honest breakdown of how it went.

Leading Up
I’ve been excited for this race and have been purposefully training for it since January. There were three weeks between my last race and this one, so I took it a little easy in the days right after that race, did hard workouts that weekend and through the next week, then tapered through the last week. My legs were feeling pretty fatigued at the start of last week, but till race day rolled around I was feeling pretty good. I don’t think I absolutely nailed the timing of the preparation, but it’s hard to find fault with it.

The Swim

This is going to be the longest part of the report, you’ve been warned…

Though I felt I had trained well for it, this was my first time swimming 1500 meters in open water and it went horribly. Aside from being nervous, the water was colder than I’m used to and I was having trouble breathing. I started to freak out while I was in the water before the race even started and had to swim to a kayak. I was holding onto it as the swim started.

The official in the kayak asked if I was okay and I told him, pretty panicky I imagine, “I don’t know if I can do this.”

He said, “Yes you can. You’re at least going to try, right? Come on, I’ll paddle along next to you to make sure you’re okay.”

I said “ok,” let go, began swimming, and he paddled right along next to me. Soon I was calm, found my rhythm, and it felt normal, just like all the training I’d done. The guy on the kayak disappeared after a few minutes, letting me go to finish on my own. I got through the rest of the swim fine, though very slowly.

I am extremely grateful for that guy on the kayak, if it wasn’t for him I probably would have just quit. More thoughts about this at the end.

I didn’t wear my watch for the swim, but my official time was 37:15, which is just awful. If you take out the horrible start maybe I actually did it a minute or two faster, but still…

Transition 1
The first transition went pretty well. It was my first time racing/doing a transition in a wetsuit and I know I could have done it quicker, but I made it through pretty quickly and without incident.

Time: 2:32

The Bike

This was the most challenging bike course I’ve done in a race. There was over 1700 feet of climbing (what’s depicted above) including a long hard climb starting about 2 miles in, and lots of steep little climbs that made you work. I went for it though and am pretty pleased with my ride.

Due to the horrible swim I got out of the water in 45th position overall out of 53, and last of 8 in my age group. I worked my way back to 19th (I think) overall and 4th in my age group by the end of the bike. I had the 8th overall fastest bike time, though still wasn’t close to the overall winners. Unfortunately, about a mile or two from T2 I started to feel soreness in my legs and I realized I might have over done it.

Time: 1:21:46

Transition 2
T2 went smooth. I know I can get my transition times down, but I didn’t make any mistakes that I can think of.

Time: 1:16

The Run

The run was an out and back course with a decent hill about a mile from transition, then pretty flat in the middle. My legs felt horrible right away and weren’t loosening up. When I started up that hill they started cramping like crazy and I knew I didn’t have any chance for a good run. I had to stop and walk up the hill and took a gel and drank some water on the way, then stretched quickly at the top. You can see my pace crash in the chart. After that I started running again and just tried to pace myself to finish. I didn’t have to walk again but was much slower than I had hoped. My goal was to run as close to 7:45/miles as possible, but I ended up averaging around 8:40 and was passed twice on the run.

Time: 54:40

Overall
I spent the rest of the day just being extremely happy that I finished and celebrated how I normally do:


yes, I ate the whole pack that day. don’t judge me! 

Again, I am grateful for the gentleman on the kayak and came away from the experience with two main takeaways:

1) It doesn’t matter what you’re dealing with, big or small, when negative thoughts start popping up, it’s very easy to get down on yourself and give up. Remember to stay positive, fall back on your “training,” have faith in yourself and your support system. I need to work on this.

2) A little pep talk and being there beside someone, even just briefly, as a reassuring presence can go an awfully long way. Everyone needs help from time to time and when you see someone in need, it doesn’t take much to offer kind words and reassurance. Be that guy on the kayak.

These principles aren’t triathlon specific!

With that said though, I’m honestly disappointed in how I did. I think I came in unprepared for running a 10k after a hard 25 mile bike, so need to address my preparation. However, even with the crummy run, compared to the other people in my age group, I had the second fastest times in the bike, the run, and both transitions. If it wasn’t for my horrible swim I could have at least placed in the AG and done much better overall.

Oh well. I’m still happy to have finished, had a nice long weekend with my wife away from home, and should learn a lot from this experience. It doesn’t look like I’ll do another Olympic this year just based on what’s available and the timing, but this experience should still help me improve.

I’m taking this week off, or extremely light anyway, then will do a four week training block before my next race, which is a sprint. I’m really going to focus on swimming, though know huge gains aren’t likely at this point during the season.

Thanks a lot for following along, happy racing!

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Written by Jim

May 24, 2017 at 10:09 pm